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How the Tasmanian devil inspired Stealth Cells and the Creation of FailSafe

A recent article from the Medicine by Design highlights two technologies or platforms stemming from Dr. Nagy’s lab at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at the Sinai Health System.  In addition to being a senior investigator at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute and a professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto, Dr. Nagy is the President and CSO of panCELLa.  panCELLa has the exclusive worldwide license to these two technologies or platforms.  The one platform is Induced Allogeneic Cell Tolerance (IACT) Stealth Cells, the other is FailSafe.

The one project being conducted at MbD in 2018 utilizing panCELLa’s IACT Stealth Cells was the INDUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF ALLOGRAFT TOLERANCE IN THE ABSENCE OF SYSTEMIC IMMUNOSUPPRESSION (Zuniga-Pflucker, Hirano, McGaha, Brooks, Nagy, Nostro, van der Kooy)

There were three projects running at MbD in 2018 utilizing panCELLa’s exclusive FailSafe:

  1.  IMPROVING THE FUNCTION, INTEGRATION AND SAFETY OF STEM CELL-DERIVED CARDIOMYOCYTE TRANSPLANTATION (Laflamme, Keller, Cheng, Nagy);
  2.  INTRODUCING FAIL-SAFE PLURIPOTENT CELLS INTO CLINICALLY RELEVANT CELL THERAPY APPLICATIONS (Nagy, Waddell, Post); and,
  3.  CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR STROKE REPAIR (Moorshead, Nagy, Shoicet, Lipsman)

(See this past post entitled Interdisciplinary research team tackles remaining hurdles to using stem cells to reverse heart failure for further information on these projects)

The MbD story in addition to highlighting panCELLa’s exclusive IACT Stealth Cells and FailSafe Cells, talks about the recent publication in Nature on how FailSafe Cells are able to quantify the risk and improve the safety of cell therapies:

A contagious facial cancer that has ravaged Tasmanian devils in southern Australia isn’t the first place one would look to find the key to advancing cell therapies in humans.

But that’s exactly what first inspired a Medicine by Design-funded research team to improve the safety of stem cell-derived treatments by programming the cells to die if they mutate in ways that harm patients. The development of “safe cells,” an advance outlined in a paper published today in Nature, could be a critical step toward the widespread use of cell therapies, which hold the potential to treat and even cure diseases such as heart failure, eye diseases, diabetes and stroke…. [Read more]

panCELLa looks forward to further collaboration with SHS and Dr. Nagy’s lab at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute.

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